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OSHA's Top 10 Violations for 2015 and Trends for 2016

Posted by Joshua Fleishman on Fri, Oct 16, 2015 @ 09:30 AM

OSHA recently announced this fiscal year's preliminary list of their "Top 10" most frequently cited workplace safety violations. Below, you will find the list as well some insight on OSHA's new approach to inspections and trends for 2016. In the coming weeks, we will be releasing blog articles written with the intent of showcasing these top violations, and how to avoid them.

The "Top 10" for FY 2015 are:Fall protection is still the most cited OSHA safety violation

  1. Fall Protection (Construction) 
    • Standard Cited: 1926.501 - 6,721 violations
    • Violations up (6,143 in FY 2014)
  2. Hazard Communication
    • Standard Cited: 1910.1200 - 5,192 violations
    • Violations up (5,161 in FY 2014)
  3. Scaffolding (Construction)
    • Standard Cited: 1926.451 - 4,295 violations
    • Violations up (4,029 in FY 2014)
  4. Respiratory Protection
    • Standard Cited: 1910.134 - 3,305 violations
    • Violations down (3,223 in FY 2014)
  5. Lockout/Tagout
    • Standard Cited: 1910.147 - 3,002 violations
    • Violations up (2,704 in FY 2014)
  6. Powered Industrial Trucks
    • Standard Cited: 1910.178 - 2,760 violations
    • Violations up (2,662 in FY 2014)
  7. Ladders (Construction)
    • Standard Cited: 1926.1053 - 2,489 violations
    • Violations up (2,448 in FY 2014)
  8. Electrical-Wiring Methods
    • Standard Cited: 1910.305 - 2,404 violations
    • Violations down (2,490 in FY 2014)
  9. Machine Guarding
    • Standard Cited: 1910.212 - 2,295 violations
    • Violations up (2,200 in FY 2014)
  10. Electrical-General Requirements
    • Standard Cited: 1910.303 - 1,973 violations
    • Violations down (2,056 in FY 2014)

Remember, these are what causes the majority of injuries and deaths as well as what a compliance officer would look for most often during inspections.

Also, OSHA had announced that it will change the way it approaches inspections. The plan was to (starting this month, October 2015) emphasize quality over quantity. The idea was that OSHA would then be able to tackle more complicated, time-consuming inspections and therefore more impactful inspections. There is a bit of pressure under the current system to make the numbers, and hopefully with a new system, more meaningful and effective inspections can occur and lead to improved worker safety.

The last piece to note is about enforcement trends. As the number of inspections may change going into 2016 due to the changes in their approach to inspections, the trend of paying higher fines per citation has been continued into 2015 and may very well continue into 2016 seeing as the new system of inspections will focus on these more impactful inspections. Also to note on that subject is OSHA's Severe Violator Enforcement Program (SVEP) which saw an almost 25% increase from 2014 to 2015, and continues onwards to today. Lastly, many more OSHA inspections are brought about by employee complaints, as OSHA has reached out to employees directly and allows easier access for them to go online and reach out to OSHA. Unjustifed complaints come in, due to disgrunted employees or whatnot, but this can be reduced by creating good safety culture within their workplace. Expect this trend of more concerned employees reaching out to continue.

Tags: osha training, osha most cited, OSHA, osha compliance, osha top violations, osha safety, osha general industry training, osha safety topics, osha violations, osha safety training, osha violations 2015

(Too) Common Scissor & Forklift Sights, Made Right!

Posted by Joshua Fleishman on Fri, Jul 10, 2015 @ 09:55 AM
      This blog article will be what is normally known as, "short but sweet." If you are unfamiliar with that term, ultimately what it means is that there is a small, digestable amount of content here but the effects of it are well received. I have, in recent memory, come across a few pictures and topics that I wanted to discuss with a community who values safety and believes that a good safety culture can prevent accidents, incidents, injuries, and fatalities.

      As an instructor of aerial work platforms (AWPs) & powered industrial trucks (PITs), I have the privilege of being able to visit many different workplaces. In doing this I see a lot of sites and because of this, I am able to fully understand how these lifts are being used in the field. In operator training we learn about how to safely operate the machine, however we couldn't hope to cover every instance of do's & don'ts that can come up. So I have decided to write this article as an extension of the training we provide in our forklift and scissor & boom lift training courses. All of these pictures/scenarios should be thought of as laterally applied to all makes/models of the specific lift (scissor or forklift, respectively).

      I have chosen four scenarios related to scissor lifts and forklifts that will showcase real applications (some not so safe) of these lifts to raise awareness both of the hazards of this type of usage but also why they are dangerous and what to do/use as an acceptable alternate.

Without further ado, here is the first scenario.

Scenario 1: Extension Deck Use

Scissor_Lift_Safety_Fail_-_Man_Incorrectly_Using_Extension_Deck_as_Hoisting_Device-Resize

      Taking a look at this picture, a few things come into mind. The chain & rope/webbing used could or could not be rated for the work load, the scissor lift isn't on the same horizontal platform as the trailer used for the wielding work, and of course, how can one be sure the trailer stays at an optimal horizontal level? One slip of the trailer forward and the beam is suspended and would most likely pull the lift over with it. That brings me to my most important point, using the extension deck as an overhead crane is not allowed by the manufacturer. The biggest hazard in a scissor lift is a tip over hazard and this type of use for a scissor lift creates a huge potential tip over hazard. As I said earlier, use the pictures here laterally across all makes and models. With that being said, I took the liberty to look up a few different scissor lift manuals and find out what their load limits are for the extension deck.

Genie GS-2032: Platform extended - Extension only 250 lbs or 113 kg
Genie GS-2632: Platform extended - Extension only 250 lbs or 113 kg
Skyjack SJIII 3215: Manual Extension Platform Capacity - 250 lbs or 113 kg
Skyjack SJIII 3219: Manual Extension Platform Capacity - 250 lbs or 113 kg
Skyjack SJIII 3220: Manual Extension Platform Capacity - 250 lbs or 113 kg
Skyjack SJIII 3226: Manual Extension Platform Capacity - 250 lbs or 113 kg
Skyjack SJIII 4620: Manual Extension Platform Capacity - 299 lbs or 136 kg
Skyjack SJIII 4626: Manual Extension Platform Capacity - 299 lbs or 136 kg
Skyjack SJIII 4632: Manual Extension Platform Capacity - 250 lbs or 113 kg

And of course, the Condor 2633 shown in the picture: Rated Work Load on extension deck only - 250 lbs.


      So the real question is if that steel beam is over 250 lbs.? I'd venture a guess and say that's correct with an almost certainty. This, again, creates a tip over hazard and thus, should be avoided. As a last note, these capacities are rated for a person and/or tools ON the extension deck, not hanging or fixed items attached to the deck. In fact, it clearly states in every one of these manuals that no objects should be attached (fixed or hanging) to any part of the machine.

Now onto the second scenario.

Scenario 2: Top Rail Use

Scissor_Lift_Safety_Fail_-_Man_on_Ladder_on_Top_of_Top_Rail-Resize

       This one is a bit more straight-forward, as many people seem to know that you are not supposed to use the top rail, specifically (as shown here) setting up a ladder on top of the top rail is quite dangerous. The stability of the machine is rated to a specific load weight and by climbing on or adding a ladder to the top rail you are creating more of a tip over hazard. Not to mention, there is a maximum side load force on that rail and by adding additional weight (as in a human or a ladder with a human) you can actually cause that rail to collapse under the weight and of course then a fall occurs. Since there is no fall protection necessary for a scissor lift, falling is not going to be a pleasant situation for anyone. Again, this one should be known to many, but unfortunately we see this scenario too often when an employee is trying to create an extra few feet (sometime inches) to reach whatever it is that they are working on. Frankly, if you can't reach what you are trying to work on with the scissor lift in question, you have two choices: either get a new lift (bigger scissor, boom lift, etc.) or don't do the job. Unfortunately, sometimes bosses don't want to hear this so you are caught in a predicament. Well, to help your protest, here is the citeable OSHA standard used to regulate such behavior:

"Employees shall always stand firmly on the floor of the basket, and shall not sit or climb on the edge of the basket or use planks, ladders, or other devices for a work position." 

Now onto scenario three.

Scenario #3: Forklift Standing on Forks/Mast

Forklift_Safety_Fail_-_Man_Standing_on_Top_of_Mast-Resize 

      Once again, this is generally for the reason I spoke of earlier, which is an additional few feet or so to the task at hand. Having someone ride the forks like an elevator may also be used because a company/ the individual doesn't have access to a proper machine such as a scissor lift or even better in many cases, a boom lift. Either that or they are some ignorant operators enjoying what they think is a toy in which case, that calls into question whether they were properly trained in the first place. For the purposes of this article, we will discuss the former. Seeing this picture, I understand very well what they were attempting to do. It would be a good assumption to say that they didn't have a way to get to those stage lights and so the idea they settled on was to ride the forks to the top of the mast. This is a huge hazard, and the way to avoid is simply to have the correct tools for the job. Seeing as this is outside, a rented boom lift would solve this problem quite easily. Another option would be to purchase or rent an attachment for their forklift that would allow a person to "ride" on the forks. This is usually a cage or platform made for such purposes. Certainly, just about any other option than having a person try to balance themselves 20+ feet in the air on the mast of a forklift!

Onto our final scenario.

Scenario #4: Ladders on Forklift Forks

Forklift_Safety_Fail_-_Man_Standing_on_Ladder_on_Forks-Resize

      This last picture/scenario is another one that I have seen posted a few times before. Going along with the previous scenario, where we learned (or reaffirmed) that standing on the mast or the forks without the proper attachment is dangerous and a fineable offense from OSHA, propping a ladder up on the forks is more of the same with regards to hazards and "don't do's." First off, there is a stability issue. Wind is a factor, unlevel ground is a factor, the forklift that you no longer control is a factor. In fact, that is ultimately what I want to point out here. As I said, much of what I talked about in the third scenario applies here, however I am able to talk about one additional important factoid related to forklifts and aerial lifts in general, and that is the control of the machine via the operator. One of the biggest reasons scissor lifts were created to begin with is because they allowed for the operator to both drive and elevate themselves without needing a second person. If you had a ladder on top of a truck or van, even if it was 100% stable, you still have to come back down to ground level to move your working platform (the ladder), not to mention the additional hazard of someone else (even if accidentally) can come and move the vehicle while you are suspended in mid-air! These hazards were mitigated by the use of scissor lifts, where we can go up, for example, and fix a light bulb and then while still elevated, we can drive to the next bulb and finish a row in minutes instead of an hour of up, down, drive, up, down, drive, etc. This scenario is harking back to the "old, dangerous days" of having no way of controlling the working platform while elevated. If that ladder gives, you're hurting. If the forklift moves, you're hurting. If the wind picks up, you're hurting. And with no fall protection required on a ladder, you can imagine what the outcome would look like. Again, the use of an industrial scissor lift (industrial because this picture takes place outside) would a great option, or again, a boom lift would suffice. With a boom lift, you could be relatively far away from roads, trees, power lines, etc. and simply extend the boom platform right up to where you need to work, and you have all the control in the moving of both your cage/working platform, and the driving of the machine is also in your hands. 

      Now, I understand that some of these options may set one back more time and/or money. But I assure you the cost of training yourself or your employees properly to use of these machines, or the cost of renting/buying one of these pieces of equipment or an additional lift is leagues below the cost of a settlement, the cost of a life, the cost of a lawsuit, the cost of an OSHA fine, and/or the cost of the worker's compensation paid out to the affected party. There are direct and indirect costs to these, whether you know it or not, that make these the more expensive options! The cost of a rental boom is nothing compared to the millions or even billions (depending on your company) in just indirect costs alone! These are what you don't think of when in the moment and tell an employee or think to yourself, "It'll only take a moment." That moment is all that is needed for an incident to occur and a terrible fate to potentially follow. If you agree, share this article and help promote a good, solid safety culture at your workplace. If you disagree, tell me below why and I will be sure to take some time and discuss your thoughts with you. Thank you for reading!
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If you have a need for aerial lift or forklift training, or any other OSHA-related training, STS is ready to assist you in choosing the right training for your situation. We also offer PPE, air monitoring equipment, fall protection, first aid kits, AEDs, and many things in between! We are available to your company for consulting work, to assist you with any rescue team needs, as well as supplied air trailers available for rent! Contact us below to find out how our blended safety services can assist ANY company with safety or OSHA related needs.

Contact STS Today!

Tags: OSHA, awp training, forklift safety, aerial lift operator training, scissor lift safety, boom lift training, osha safety topics, osha violations

OSHA Announced Their Top 10 Most Cited Violations for 2014

Posted by Joshua Fleishman on Mon, Sep 22, 2014 @ 09:00 AM

OSHA's preliminary top 10 violations for fiscal year 2014 were recently announced at the National Safety Council Expo by the deputy director of OSHA's Directorate of Enforcement Programs, Patrick Kapust.

Before we cover those most cited standards, let's a look at a few statistics from 2013.

  • The 3,929 fatal work injuries that occurred in private industry isSafety training - Driver fell asleep at the wheel the lowest total since BLS began collecting this data more than 20 years ago.
  • Transportation-related incidents accounted for 40% of all fatal work injuries, but declined in 2013.
  • One out of six fatal work injuries was the result of violence – including suicide and homicide.
  • Fatal work injuries involving contractors accounted for 17% of all fatal work injuries in 2013.

In some aspects things are better, but clearly, we still have much work to do. Based on 2013's numbers, on average, there are 85 deaths a week or more than 12 deaths every day. Despite being the lowest total since the fatal injury census was first conducted in 1992, that's still too many deaths!

Many, if not close to all, of these deaths are preventable with proper training and a conscience decision from all parties involved to do things as safe as possible and report unsafe actions. As you can see in the most frequently cited standards, many are still "doing it the way we always have done it." For some, this is laziness or a disregard for safety; and for others, it is simply ignorance to the rules and guidelines. The numbers below should be a reminder that we do still have much to do, and that will be hard without open dialogue and a decision to do better for the sake of all those who became a statistic below.
 

Top 10 Most Frequently Cited Standards for FY 2014:

 

  1. Fall Protection (Construction) (29 CFR 1926.501) 6,143 violations
    1. Examples being: failing to use fall protection correctly or failing to provide fall protection.
       
  2. Hazard Communications (29 CFR 1910.1200) 5,161 violations
    1. Examples being: failing to have safety data sheets (SDS) for each chemical in the workplace or chemical labeling mistakes.
       
  3. Scaffolding (Construction) (29 CFR 1926.451) 4,029 violations
    1. Examples being: loading scaffolds in excess of their capacity or failing to protect employees from fall hazards on scaffolds.
       
  4. Respiratory Protection (29 CFR 1910.134) 3,223 violations
    1. Examples being: lack of a written program or failing to train employees.
       
  5. Lockout / Tagout (29 CFR 1910.147) 2,704 violationslockout tagout training
    1. Examples being: complete lack of a hazardous energy control program or failing to apply locks.
       
  6. Powered Industrial Trucks (29 CFR 1910.178) 2,662 violations
    1. Examples being: lack of operator training or forklifts not in safe operating condition.
       
  7. Electrical - Wiring Methods (29 CFR 1910.305) 2,490 violations
    1. Examples being: conductors enter boxes unprotected or employees are exposed to live contacts.
       
  8. Ladders (Construction) (29 CFR 1926.1053) 2,448 violations
    1. Examples being: using an inappropriate type of ladder for the job or using a ladder not designed for the load it is carrying.
       
  9. Machine Guarding (29 CFR 1910.212) 2,200 violations
    1. Examples being: not using guards at point of operation for machinery that may pose a hazard or guards are removed by employees.
       
  10. Electrical - General Requirements (29 CFR 1910.303) 2,056 violations
    1. Examples being: not having workers appropriately trained to avoid electric shock or electrocution or not guarding live parts.
       
      Fall protection, safety harness
Seeing fall protection at the top as the the most cited OSHA violationshouldn't surprise you. If you haven't noticed, that is its fourth year in a row at that spot! The data presented here is preliminary. The finalized data and additional details will be posted in December. Check back then when we will update this article (or post a new one) to include the revised  and additional data.


In the meantime, share this information with others! Whether its by emailing or sharing this article on social media sites, or by simple word of mouth at work or with friends. This information is worth most when everyone has the knowledge to prevent these types of accidents. Even if you don't work for a multibillion dollar company, think of the small businesses that have so much to think about that they are oblivious to these facts. To a small company, something so small as a simply hand injury can cost tens of thousands of dollars when you consider direct/indirect costs, medical bills, worker's comp, legal fees, etc.


Do your part and help create a safe working environment for all! If you enjoyed this article, please add STS on Facebook or Twitter. As always, if you have ANY safety-related questions, feel free to email us or contact us online!

Tags: osha training, osha violations 2014, osha most cited, safety training, osha compliance, osha top violations, osha violations

OSHA Violations 2013, Detailed: Serious vs. Willful

Posted by Joshua Fleishman on Tue, Feb 18, 2014 @ 09:00 AM

In a previous article, we covered the 'Top Ten Violations' by Federal OSHA for FY 2013. I have wanted to come back to this topic once a bit more information was revealed, and what do you know? I recently came across an article from the National Safety Council (NSC.org) that not only had my previous list of "Most Frequently Cited" from last year, but it also included the top five sections cited under each OSHA Standard. As an added bonus, I have also included the "Top 10 Serious Violations" and the "Top 10 Willful Violations." Of course, both of these are for FY 2013 as well. 

Before I jump into the numbers, I wanted to help our readers fully understand what the difference between these types of violations. I have included below the definitions as stated by OSHA.

TYPES OF VIOLATIONS

osha 10, osha training, osha safety topics, osha courses, osha general industry trainingSERIOUS: A serious violation exists when the workplace hazard could cause an accident or illness that would most likely result in death or serious physical harm, unless the employer did not know or could not have known of the violation.
WILLFUL: A willful violation is defined as a violation in which the employer either knowingly failed to comply with a legal requirement (purposeful disregard) or acted with plain indifference to employee safety.

 

 

OSHA’s Top 10 Most Frequently Cited Violations for FY 2013

  1. Fall Protection – General Requirements (1926.501) – 8,739 
    • Residential construction [(b)(13)] – 4,733
    • Unprotected sides and edges [(b)(1)] – 1,696
    • Roofing work on low-slope roofs [(b)(10)] – 912
    • Steep roofs [(b)(11)] – 656
    • Holes [(b)(4)] – 328
       
       
  • Hazard Communication (1910.1200) – 6,556 
      • Maintaining a written hazard communication program [(e)(1)] – 2,469
      • Providing employees with information and training [(h)(1)] – 1,561
      • Chemical container labeling [(f)(5)] – 701
      • Maintaining Safety Data Sheets [(g)(8)] – 611
      • Obtaining or developing Safety Data Sheets [(g)(1)] – 496
         
         
  • Scaffolding (1926.451) – 5,724 
      • Protection from falls to a lower level [(g)(1)] – 1,589
      • Planking or decking requirements [(b)(1)] – 788
      • Point of access for scaffold platforms [(e)(1)] – 871
      • Foundation requirements [(c)(2)] – 632
      • Guardrail requirements [(g)(4)] – 376
         
  • Respiratory Protection (1910.134) – 4,153 osha 10, osha training, osha safety topics, osha courses, osha general industry training
      • Medical evaluation general requirements [(e)(1)] – 705
      • Establishing and implementing written respirator protection program [(c)(1)] – 650
      • Covering situations when respirator use is not required [(c)(2)] – 510
      • Respirator selection general requirements [(d)(1)] – 342
      • Ensuring respirators are fit tested [(f)(2)] – 332
         
  • Electrical – Wiring Methods (1910.305) – 3,709 
      • Use of flexible cords and cables [(g)(1)] – 1,004
      • Conductors entering boxes, cabinets, or fittings [(b)(1)] – 821
      • Identification, splices and terminations [(g)(2)] – 703
      • Covers and canopies [(b)(2)] – 577
      • Temporary wiring [(a)(2)] – 194
         
         
  • Powered Industrial Trucks (1910.178) – 3,544 
      • Safe operation [(l)(1)] – 905
      • Refresher training and evaluation [(l)(4)] – 575
      • Avoidance of duplicative training [(l)(6)] – 377
      • Taking truck out of service when repairs are necessary [(p)(1)] – 336
      • Maintenance of industrial trucks [(q)(7)] – 304
         
  • Ladders (1926.1053) – 3,524 
      • Requirements for portable ladders used for accessing upper landing surfaces [(b)(1)] – 1,866
      • Ladder use only for its designed purpose [(b)(4)] – 482
      • Not using the top or top step of step-ladder as a step [(b)(13)] – 268
      • Marking portable ladders with structural defects with tags noting them as defective [(b)(16)] – 215
      • Employees shall not carry objects or loads that could cause them to lose balance and fall [(b)(22)] – 107
         
  • osha 10, osha training, osha safety topics, osha courses, osha general industry trainingLockout/Tagout (1910.147) – 3,505 
      • Energy control procedure [(c)(4)] – 996
      • Periodic inspection [(c)(6)] – 653
      • Energy control program [(c)(1)] – 651
      • Training and communication [(c)(7)] – 580
      • Lockout or tagout device application [(d)(4)] – 169
         
         
  • Electrical – General Requirements (1910.303) – 2,932
      • Installation and use of equipment [(b)(2)] – 814
      • Space around electric equipment [(g)(1)] – 670
      • Guarding of live parts [(g)(2)] – 347
      • Services, feeders, and branch circuits [(f)(2)] – 327
      • Examination of equipment [(b)(1)] – 280
         
         
  • Machine Guarding (1910.212) – 2,852
      • Types of guarding [(a)(1)] – 1,815
      • Point of operation guarding [(a)(3)] – 662
      • Anchoring fixed machinery [(b)] – 214
      • Exposure of blades [(a)(5)] – 79
      • General requirements [(a)(2)] – 73

    Top 10 Serious Violations Federal OSHA issued in FY 2013

    1. osha 10, osha training, osha safety topics, osha courses, osha general industry trainingFall Protection (1926.501) – 7,492
       
    2. Scaffolding (1926.451) – 5,213
       
    3. Hazard Communication (1910.1200) – 3,761
       
    4. Ladders (1926.1053) – 3,162
       
    5. Electrical – Wiring Methods (1910.305) – 2,923
       
    6. Lockout/Tagout (1910.147) – 2,832
       
    7. Machine Guarding (1910.212) – 2,588
       
    8. Powered Industrial Trucks (1910.178) – 2,539
       
    9. Respiratory Protection (1910.134) – 2,365
       
    10. Electrical – General Requirements (1910.303) – 2,204

    Top 10 Willful Violations Federal OSHA issued in FY 2013

    1. Fall protection (1926.501) – 73
       
    2. Excavations (1926.652) – 34
       
    3. Lead (1926.62) – 25
       
    4. Machine Guarding (1910.212) – 23
       
    5. Lockout/Tagout (1910.147) – 20
       
    6. Scaffolding (1926.451) – 19
       
    7. Guarding Floor and Wall Openings and Holes (1910.23) – 18
       
    8. Respiratory Protection (1910.134) – 17
       
    9. Process Safety Management (1910.119) – 14
       
    10. Powered Industrial Trucks (1910.178) – 10

    Remember, in the safety world, if you think you have a problem....chances are you do! This is where Safety Training Services can help! We will train (and/or retrain) you and your employees on OSHA compliance & other safety-related courses. Our site or yours, our hands-on courses will provide you with appropriate training to keep you safe and consistent to OSHA requirements.
    Let me see  the classes!

    Tags: osha 10 general industry, osha 30 general industry, osha 10 construction industry, osha 10 class, osha violations 2013, osha general industry training, osha violations, osha 30 class

    OSHA Violations - Top in 2013 & Other OSHA Facts

    Posted by Joshua Fleishman on Mon, Nov 25, 2013 @ 12:45 PM

    OSHA’s Top 10 Violations for 2013
    (& Other Interesting OSHA Facts)

    • Federal OSHA has 10 regional offices and 90 local area offices.Osha compliance, osha classes, osha safety, osha training

    • They had a budget of $563,658,000 in FY 2013.

    • They conducted 40,961 Federal inspections in FY 2012.

    • 4,383 workers were killed on the job in 2012.

    • That's 3.2 per 100,000 full-time equivalent workers

    On average, more than 84 a week or nearly 12 deaths every day.

    • This is the second lowest preliminary total since the fatal injury census was first conducted in 1992.

    • Fatal work injuries involving contractors accounted for 16 percent of all fatal work injuries in 2012.

    • Out of 3,945 worker fatalities in private industry in calendar year 2012, 775 or 19.6% were in construction.

      • The leading causes of worker deaths on construction sites were falls, followed by struck by object, electrocution, and caught-in/between.

      • These "Fatal Four" were responsible for nearly three out of five (56%) construction worker deaths in 2012.


    Eliminating the Fatal Four would save 435 workers' lives in America every year.

    • osha falls, osha violations, Falls – 278 out of 775 total deaths in construction in CY 2012 (36%)
    • Struck by Object – 78 (10%)
    • Electrocutions – 66 (9%)
    • Caught-in/between – 13 (2%)

     

     

    OSHA’s Top Ten Violations for 2013

    The following were the top 10 most frequently cited standards by Federal OSHA in fiscal year 2013 (October 1, 2012 through September 30, 2013):

    1. Fall Protection (1926.501) 8,241 violations (No Change) (991 more than 2012)
       
    2. Hazard Communication (1910.1200) 6,156 violations (No Change) (1,460 more than 2012)
       
    3. Scaffolding (1926.451) 5,423 violations (No Change) (1,609 more than 2012)
       
    4. Respiratory Protection (1910.134) 3,879 violations (No Change) (1,508 more than 2012)
       
    5. Electrical, Wiring Methods (1910.305) 3,452 violations (Up 3) (1,708 more than 2012)
       
    6. Powered Industrial Trucks (1910.178) 3,340 violations (Up 1) (1,347 more than 2012)
       
    7. Ladders (1926.1053) 3,311 violations (Down 2) (1,001 more than 2012)
       
    8. Lockout/Tagout (1910.147) 3,254 violations (Up 1) (1,682 more than 2012)
       
    9. Electrical, General Requirements (1910.303) 2,745 violations (Up 1) (1,413 more than 2012)
       
    10. Machine Guarding (1910.212) 2,701 violations (Down 4) (604 more than 2012)

     

    OSHA is Making a Differencesafety, safety training, osha 30 class, osha 10, osha 10 training
     

    • Since 1970, workplace fatalities have been reduced by more than 65 percent and occupational injury and illness rates have declined by 67 percent. At the same time, U.S. employment has almost doubled.
    • Worker deaths in America are down–on average, from about 38 worker deaths a day in 1970 to 12 a day in 2012.
    • Worker injuries and illnesses are down–from 10.9 incidents per 100 workers in 1972 to 3.5 per 100 in 2011.

     

    Don't become a statistic!

    osha training standards, osha 10 general industry, osha-10, osha violations 2013So what should you do, now armed with this knowledge? Well, first thing is get up and simply take a look around your office/plant/factory. Do you see any of these standards violated? In the safety world, if you think you have a problem....chances are you do! If you do not know you have violations or do not know how to look for them, that's perfectly understandable--you are not alone. This is where Safety Training Services can help!

    Your next step should be to identify these issues. Have you found them to be problems in training (or lack thereof)? Or retraining (annual refresher courses)? Unsatisfied with previous training/trainers? Remember, ignorance is bliss....until you get a visit from OSHA. We will train (and/or retrain) you and your employees on OSHA compliance & other safety-related courses. Our site or yours, our hands-on courses will provide you with appropriate training to keep you safe and trained consistent to OSHA requirements.

    Maybe your issue is equipment? Whether you need new, used, rentals, servicing or just to figure out what equipment to use for a specific job, speaking to one of our professionals in our Technical division will help you find the right tool for the job in whatever capacity necessary. 

    Or simply Contact our safety consultants at (219) 554-2180 and found out how we will help identify problems and conduct a safety-related gap analysis for your company. 

    Tags: osha 10 general industry, osha 30 general industry, osha 10 construction industry, osha 10 class, osha violations 2013, osha general industry training, osha violations, osha 30 class

    Top 10 OSHA Violations & How Safety Training Services Can Assist You

    Posted by Joshua Fleishman on Thu, Feb 14, 2013 @ 12:02 PM

    OSHA Logo

    During their 2012 fiscal year (which ran from October 2011 through September 2012), federal OSHA conducted almost 41,000 workplace safety and health inspections. Very interestingly enough, it seemed as though companies didn’t take the hint from the previous year in that the top cited violation is not only still number 1, but actually increased from fiscal year 2011. Below, you find the top 10 citations they handed out to companies for 2012 and further down you may be interested to see the previous year’s top 10 as well.

     

    OSHA Top 10 ViolationsOSHA’s Top 10 for 2012

            1. Fall Protection--General Requirements (1926.501) 7,250 violations (No change)

            2. Hazard Communication (1910.1200): 4,696 violations (Up 1)

            3. Scaffolding (1926.451): 3,814 violations (Down 1)

            4. Respiratory Protection (1910.134): 2,371 violations (No change)

            5. Ladders (1926.1053): 2,310 violations (Up 3)

            6. Machine Guarding (1910.212): 2,097 violations (Up 4)

            7. Powered Industrial Trucks (1910.178): 1,993 violations (No change)

            8. Electrical--Wiring Methods (1910.305): 1,744 violations (Down 2)

            9. Lockout/Tagout (1910.147): 1,572 violations (Down 4)

            10. Electrical--General Requirements (1910.303): 1,332 violations (Down 1)

     

    OSHA’s Top 10 for 2011

    1. Fall Protection--General requirements (1926.501): 7,139 violations
       
    2. Scaffolding (1926.451): 7,069 violations
       
    3. Hazard Communication (1910.1200): 6,538 violations
       
    4. Respiratory Protection (1910.134): 3,944 violations
       
    5. Lockout/Tagout (1910.147): 3,639 violations
       
    6. Electrical--Wiring Methods (1910.305): 3,584 violations
       
    7. Powered Industrial Trucks (1910.178): 3,432 violations
       
    8. Ladders (1926.1053): 3,244 violations
       
    9. Electrical--General Requirements (1910.303): 2,863 violations
       
    10. Machine Guarding (1910.212): 2,748 violations

    Don't become a statistic!

    So what should you do, now armed with this knowledge? Well, first thing is get up and simply take a look around your office/plant/factory. Do you see any of these standards violated? In the safety world, if you think you have a problem....chances are you do! If you do not know you have violations or do not know how to look for them, that's perfectly understandable--you are not alone. This is where Safety Training Services can help!

    Your next step should be to identify these issues. Have you found them to be problems in training (or lack thereof)? Or retraining (annual refresher courses)? Unsatisfied with previous training/trainers? Remember, ignorance is bliss....until you get a visit from OSHA. We will train (and/or retrain) you and your employees on OSHA compliance & other safety-related courses. Our site or yours, our hands-on courses will provide you with appropriate training to keep you safe and trained consistent to OSHA requirements.

    Maybe your issue is equipment? Whether you need new, used, rentals, servicing or just to figure out what equipment to use for a specific job, speaking to one of our professionals in our Technical division will help you find the right tool for the job in whatever capacity necessary. 

    Or simply contact our safety consulting division at (219) 554-2180 and found out how we will help identify problems and conduct a safety-related gap analysis for your company. 

    Contact STS Today!

    Tags: osha training, safety training, osha compliance, safety training services, osha violations